Pharmacist-led education curriculum for fourth-year medical students: a single-center experience

Main Article Content

Bashayer Mohammed Alshehail https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2372-9462
Haytham Abdulaziz Wali https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6279-3809
Zainab Al Jamea https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4549-2638
Nouf Alotaibi https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7029-3089
Abdulsalam Alasseri https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1531-7214
Abdulaziz Aldahami https://orcid.org/0009-0002-0473-7993
Abdulsattar AlHussain
Duaa Alsulaiman https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6070-2539
Ebtesam ALGeri https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9556-4252
Mohammad Alhassan https://orcid.org/0009-0004-7133-0274
Salma Ansassy https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9010-6145
Hani Alharbi https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9059-5404
Fatma AlRoubia https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9224-3581
Mohab Manna https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9883-2547
Marwan Alwazzeh https://orcid.org/0009-0000-9695-3364
Sara Al-Warthan https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4079-1559

Keywords

Pharmacist-led Education, Curriculum, Medical Students, knowledge, Interprofessional Education

Abstract

Background: Doctors are usually challenged by the transition between theoretical basic science knowledge and actual clinical practice. Thus, a critical educational intervention is the early incorporation of pharmacists into the pharmacotherapy courses for undergraduate medical students from their college years and moving to the practice setting. Objective: We sought to determine if a pharmacist-led education course would improve medical students’ knowledge of general pharmacotherapy topics. Methods: All fourth-year female medical students were invited to enroll in the pharmacy practice curriculum between January and March 2022. The program was divided into three main domains: formal lectures, a hands-on prescription writing skills session, and on-site pharmacy practice sessions. The pharmacy practice session was divided into three sections: first section pharmacy practice, second section pharmacy innovation, and the third section clinical pharmacy. Those who completed the curriculum were requested to complete preand post-session assessments and curriculum evaluations. Results: One hundred fourteen medical students enrolled in the pharmacy practice module. One hundred eleven (97.4%) completed the pre-and post-course assessment. After completing the module, the medical students’ knowledge scores improved from pre- to post-course. A significant difference in the overall knowledge was observed between the pre-course and post-course scores (9.51 versus 16.04; p<0.001). The difference between the pre-course and post-course scores was also significant when comparing the knowledge per each part of the assessment, showing an average score of 2.78 versus 4.05 (p<0.001) for the first section; 3.39 versus 5.49 (p<0.001) for the second section; 3.34 versus 6.48 (p<0.001) for the third section. The program received overall positive feedback; the experience was rated overall as “Excellent” by 73% of the participants. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the impact of a pharmacist-led curriculum for medical students on improving their knowledge of fundamental pharmacy practice areas.

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